Yoga — in da HOUSE!

Few would argue that home yoga practice is less legitimate than studio practice. In fact, part of a well-disciplined yoga practice includes personal home

"Yoga Girl" rap by David Wittman

“Yoga Girl” rap by David Wittman

practice.

But what if personal home practice was your entire practice?

Does yoga need to be shared and witnessed to be legitimized?

I’m asking these weighty questions because I’m going into my second week of home practice. My first experience with yoga at the tender age of five years was a home practice and it created the foundation for my adult practice. Sometimes it’s simply more practical to practice at home, and sometimes — at least for me — it’s a preference.

I may head to the studio next week, but if it’s anything like this past week, I’ll be building my yoga — in da house.

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Prairie yoga surfing

Stumbled on this tweet by @sarabynoe.

True, it’s funny, but it’s a wonderful image too. From this prairie girl to all you west coast yogis/yoginis, I’d rather join you in yoga on your surf boards, than my surfer prairie cousins:

 

 

Doing it everywhere!

It’s true — you can practice yoga everywhere. After enjoying an unofficial long weekend, I’m behind in house maintenancey-type things, like

grocery shopping, laundry, CLEANING… Sadly, there’s no time to hit the yoga studio today, but this image (from Tamara Dorris’ blog) has inspired me. Since I can’t get to my yoga, I’m going to take my practice with me today!

Did you get to the studio today?

Great Yoga Wall: Where Deep Tissue Massage Meets Yoga

For the past two weeks I’ve been experimenting with a new, decades old, yoga practice — The Great Yoga Wall — and I’m hooked! The Great Yoga Wall itself is new, but the principle of practicing yoga on a Yoga Wall is decades old.

What’s involved: The Great Yoga Wall

An open mind, and few pieces of equipment. The key being the pelvic swing, which is essentially a sling attached to specially designed wall plates.

Practicing yoga while tethered to the wall by a sling is both intense and satisfying. The idea behind this restorative yoga practice is to help students deepen their postures, which I’ll say is a strong benefit. What I didn’t expect, but has been a cherished byproduct of wall yoga, is the change I’m feeling in my alignment. Between classes I can feel that I’m standing taller and stronger. Also, important is the way we practice the postures on the wall — my technique on the mat is really taking off too!

I’ve included a short video from WatchMojo about The Great Yoga Wall for your viewing pleasure. If you have the chance to try your yoga on the wall, I’d go for it! Think deep tissue massage meets yoga…

Satya in Advertizing?

If you read my last blog post, you’ll know that in my effort to practice the Yama of Satya (truth in life on — and off — the mat) I’m growing out my grey and white hair. I’m ashamed to say that I’m freaking out a little about my decision to embrace my natchy hair, then I found this nugget from Adweek:

It seems superficial to think about looks and appearance to any extent beyond morning grooming time. Not so long ago, a dating deal breaker for me was guys who spent more time on their appearance than I did. Blistex was my makeup regime back then, and I usually tied my shoulder length hair into a ponytail — I can’t stand the feeling of hair on my face.

I resent the time I spend grooming these days. Incrementally over the years I lost the ability to travel light, growing dependent on increasingly more
products. I blame my wedding. 😉

Joking aside, I had my makeup done professionally for my wedding 15 years ago, and became enthralled with the power of maquillage to transform me into “one of the pretty girls”. After watching this Dove video, I’m questioning what I see in the mirror. And that’s a good thing.

Hair color & getting real

I’m told by my yoga teacher that the Yamas in yoga are — loosely translated — disciplines of yoga living. One of  the five Yamas is Satya — truthfulness and honesty in living. In Hinduism, truth is defined as “that which has no distortion”, and “that which is unchangeable”. As you can see from the image to the

Satya practice: being real

Satya practice: being real

right, I haven’t been practicing good Satya — my hair has been anything but unchangeable and undistorted for the past 18 years.

I started hennaing my hair in the nineties, when red was super-rad. Henna for me was the gateway hair color, and it didn’t take long before I’d moved into semi-permanent, and then permanent colors. Coloring didn’t start as an effort to cover grey — though I had my first white hairs in my teens. But by the time I’d hit my mid-thirties, there was a significant amount of grey & white, and I didn’t want to see them.

Fast forward to the present. I’m learning more about my yoga practice, and trying to apply yoga to my life off the mat. As I brushed my hair this morning it occurred to me that I could grow my dyed color out. Simplify my life, and save some money while I’m at it.

This post feels like a vanity post, and maybe it is a little, but it’s also more than that. If I blog about my white and grey hair, and my plan to let it grow free, I’ll have to stick to the Satya. I’m a little nervous about this — I love my black hair — but that too is a good reason to let it go. It’s a distorted reality. And after today, things are about to get real!